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Learning

Developing vital behaviors that support organizational resilience.

Learning is the process of acquiring new understanding, knowledge, behaviors, skills, values, attitudes, and preferences. The ability to learn is possessed by humans, animals, machines and some plants. Some learning is immediate, induced by a single event (e.g. being burned by a hot stove), but much skill and knowledge accumulate from repeated experiences. The changes induced by learning often last a lifetime, and it is hard to distinguish learned material that seems to be "lost" from that which cannot be retrieved.

Concepts in this Category

Mental Models

True enterprise agility requires a new mindset - a shift from a results-focus to an improvement-focus, where failure is accepted as part of the learning cycle. This new mindset pushes participants out of their comfort zones by empowering them to resolve day-to-day issues using their collective creativity, while giving them the support and safety necessary to try new ways of working. This mindset has its roots in scientific principles, where improvements are tried out and the results analyzed for imperfections - allowing an impartial judgement of outcomes.

Related Resources Show Summaries

Learning Styles and Modalities

Individuals differ in how they learn, and their ability to internalize information is likely related to the modality used for the acquisition. Learning modalities are the sensory channels or pathways through which individuals give, receive, and store information. Perception, memory, and sensation comprise the concept of modality. The modalities or senses include visual, auditory, tactile/kinesthetic, smell, and taste. From these modalities there are possibly seven learning styles: visual (spatial), aural (auditory), verbal (linguistic), physical (kinesthetic), logical (mathematical), social (interpersonal), and solitary (intrapersonal).

Training Programs

Gamification

Gamification involves the application of game-design elements and game principles (e.g. point scoring, competition with others, rules of play) to non-game contexts. It can also be defined as a set of activities and processes to solve problems by using or applying the characteristics of game elements. Gamification commonly employs game design elements to improve user engagement, organizational productivity, flow, learning, crowdsourcing, knowledge retention, employee recruitment and evaluation, ease of use, usefulness of systems, physical exercise, traffic violations, voter apathy, and more. It is often used as an online marketing technique to encourage engagement with a product or service.